There is one class per grade level in the Korean Dual Language Program.  Students register for this program on a first-come, first-served basis in Kindergarten.  Students are taught in both English and Korean in all subject areas in addition to Learning about Korean culture, holidays and customs. Beginning in October, all KDLP students in Grades K-5 will stay until 3:30pm two to three days per week.   

Parents of students in the program solely fund KDLP. All giving is optional. KDLP parents are asked to donate to the program to cover the cost of additional teacher time for the extended learning program in Korean, extra materials, field trips, etc.

What is the Korean Dual Language Program (KDLP)?

English Learners and English Proficient students receive instruction in English and Korean in the same classroom to develop academic proficiency in both languages beginning in kindergarten through fifth grade. Dual Language Programs are also known as two-way immersion programs. The KDLP program at Third Street is academically rigorous and challenging.

How many Korean Dual Language Program classes are there?

At Third Street there are six, one class per grade level.

Does my child have to know any Korean to be in the program?

No.

Do parents and/or guardians need to know any Korean to help with homework?

No. Per LAUSD policy, children are only given homework on information they have already learned in class.

How is Korean taught in the classroom?

Both English Learners and English-proficient students are mixed in the same classroom to promote bilingualism, biliteracy, and multiculturalism. Both languages are used equally for instruction at all grade levels.  Students are held to the same high academic standards. No mixing of languages-language of instruction is separated. Heterogeneous and homogeneous grouping strategies are used to promote language development and to develop literacy skills in English and Korean.

What model of teaching is used at Third Street?

50/50 Model. Both languages are used equally for instruction at all grade levels. All subjects are taught in both languages at all grade levels beginning in kindergarten. English and Korean literacy skills are taught simultaneously beginning in kindergarten.
“Dual language programs have been found to provide the greatest academic gains for language minority students when compared to the academic achievement of language minority students attending other types of bilingual or English-as-a-second language programs.” 

Thomas, W. & Collier, V. (1997) School Effectiveness for Minority Language Students

Why should children learn a second language?

Knowing a second language is important given the global nature of today’s job market. In addition, there are many benefits for the brain. When a child learns a second language, it not only activates the components of the brain that are responsible for verbal and written communication, but it also activates the areas of the brain that are directly responsible for reasoning, thinking, and numeric understanding. As a result, the child is capable of excelling in virtually every area of their academic careers.          

Is it difficult to learn Korean in kindergarten?  Why start in kindergarten?

The early school years are the best and easiest time for children to learn a language. 

A study at the University of Illinois was conducted on immigrant Chinese and Korean children living in the U.S. It showed, that the singular determining factor in their ability to speak English like a native was the age at which they immigrated. Only children who had been immersed in English before the age of seven performed as well as native speakers; the younger the children were upon arrival in the U.S., the better they scored.

Is it too late to register for the Korean Dual Language Program after kindergarten?

While it is recommended to start the Korean Dual Language Program in Kindergarten, it is still possible to join in grades 1-5, depending on the available space. Please follow the sign up directions below.

Please note that parents who have previously submitted a request for the KDLP program for the 2018-19 school year must reapply by following the application process outlined below.

How do I sign up for the Korean Dual Language Program? 

For the 2018-2019 school year, LAUSD has changed the enrollment process for incoming families interested in dual language programs.  While this does not affect the students that are currently enrolled in our Korean Dual Language Program, it will affect younger siblings, neighbors, and/or friends interested in coming to 3rd Street for our Korean dual language program. Those interested will now have to apply online at:

eChoices.lausd.net

Further information about the application process, guideline and selection criteria can be found at: http://echoices.lausd.net/DLP/DlpLottery. A Dual Language FAQ is also available at http://echoices.lausd.net/eChoicesFaq?t=m.

Is the school day longer in the Korean Dual Language Program? 

Yes. Students stay one hour for extended instruction twice a week (currently Mondays and Thursdays)

Is there a cost for the Korean Dual Language Program?

Yes, for extended learning program after school twice a week and materials for cultural activities ONLY. Currently, the amount requested is $250 per child for the year. This cost is subject to change and is strictly voluntary. While parents are asked for a donation of $250 per child, any amount is appreciated. A few fundraisers are held to supplement the program as well. 

Is the Korean Dual Language Program only for students who don’t speak English?

No. Surprisingly, students that have learned a second language or are in the process of learning a second language that have been evaluated on standardized testing procedures used in schools, received higher scores in more than just the verbal aspect of the tests. They also scored higher in math.

How long has the Korean Dual Language Program been at Third Street?

Since the fall of 2000.

When is the best time to learn a second language?

Early. Learning a second language is often challenging for older teenagers and adults, but if a child is introduced to a new language between birth and approximately eight years of age, they are more likely to learn that language with ease and understand the language.

How do the Korean Dual Language Program students get along socially?

Very well. The students stay together throughout elementary school, which promotes closeness and understanding. Grades 3-5 participate in “mixing” where all students in a grade level are formed into mixed groups from other classes then change teachers for instruction in one subject a few days a week. Lunch break and recess are with all classes from their grade, so there are opportunities to make friends throughout the school.

What teachers will my child have?

Each grade has one teacher skilled in Dual Language instruction so you will know who your teacher is year to year. However, changes in staff are always a possibility.

Will my child’s academic learning be compromised by spending time learning Korean?

No. Students are likely to have higher levels of academic success throughout school. When a child learns a second language, it not only activates the components of the brain that are responsible for verbal and written communication, but it also activates the areas of the brain that are directly responsible for reasoning, thinking, and numeric understanding. As a result, the child is capable of excelling in virtually every area of their academic careers.

Will learning a second language be confusing for my child? 

No. Learning a second language does not cause language confusion, language delay or cognitive deficit, which have been concerns in the past. In fact, according to studies at the Cornell Language Acquisition Lab (CLAL), children who learn a second language can maintain attention despite outside stimuli better than children who know only one language. 

If my child already speaks Korean, will it be harder for them to learn English in the Korean Dual Language Program?

No. English Learners tend to move up the levels on the California English Language Development Test (CELDT) sooner because they are focusing more on language in general in the Korean Dual Language Program. 

What are some other benefits of the Dual Language Program?

Besides cultural awareness and tolerance, the students participate in the arts through visual arts and school performances.   These may include Korean singing, dancing, drumming, and plays.  The students learn to be comfortable on stage and in front of an audience, useful skill for their future.                                                                                  

What are the Biliteracy Awards? 

The LAUSD Biliteracy Awards are district-wide awards to recognize students who demonstrate excellence in literacy skills in English and a language other than English. The awards are given at the end of 5th grade, 8th grade and 12th grade.

What are the Dual Language Programs offered by LAUSD? 

Korean, Mandarin, and Spanish, depending on the school.

Which middle schools offer the Korean Dual Language Program? 

John Burroughs and Berendo Middle Schools

Which high school offers the Korean Dual Language Program?

Fairfax High 

What are the goals of the Korean Dual Language Program?

Communicative and Academic second language proficiencyprimary language proficiencyacademic achievement in all subject areasand appreciation for cultural diversity.